Gorkana's Financial Times West Meet Up

San Francisco’s public relations community woke up early to enjoy a stimulating breakfast, hosted by Gorkana Group US and featuring the Financial Times. Richard Waters, San Francisco Bureau Chief and Editor, was joined by Correspondent Sarah Mishkin and the panel was moderated by Gorkana Group’s US Managing Director, Jeni Chapman. The lively panel imparted valuable pitching tips, discussed the trending stories they’re following, and offered their viewpoints on covering the tech bubble that is the Valley.

The Financial Times Difference

Richard Waters began by sharing some background on the global daily media outlet that has gone digital – with a large proportion of its subscribers getting the on-line edition that is published in four regions. The publication is truly global given its editing desks in London, Hong Kong and New York, which allows the Financial Times to cover news 24 hours a day. Indeed, 80% of the content developed by one hub is then shared around the world.. The San Francisco bureau provides coverage of the international technology industry for the paper’s worldwide audience of senior level business leaders and policy makers. Richard believes the mission is to tell readers what bigger forces are shaping their worlds, what issues are coming down the pike and what they should care about.

What themes gets the Financial Times West attention (and why)?

Examples of stories that currently are on point for the FT West team include:

  • the digital platform wars and their socio-economic implications for consumers
  • how technology innovation from smaller businesses is stimulating growth around the world – and how not all of that innovation is coming from the US backyard. For example, technology around how to enable “dumb phones” for e-commerce is a huge market place need in the developing world and this need is being met by innovators outside the US.
  • and how technology platforms are impacting and changing society.

How does a start-up get covered?

The Financial Times strives to spot industry trends early by looking at interesting, smaller businesses that are being led by an experienced or well-known management team and or by known tech funding firms. They follow pre-IPO companies that are receiving funding and going through the valuation process. The FT also keeps a keen eye on behavioral trends and produces stories that show how a product or proposition is driving a shift in consumer activity.

The Basics – What to do (and not to do) when working with the FT West team

In terms of best practice when working with the FT, Sarah and Richard had these recommendations for PR professionals:

  • Keep your pitches short but never pitch them over Twitter. Email only.
  • Never call to ask if they received your email. They have. If they have not responded, they are not interested or not able to go after the story at this time
  • As Sarah Mishkin said “ if your pitch is longer than my stories, that’s a problem.”
  • Don’t constantly re-schedule meetings – even if you are one of the “big tech” companies. And especially don’t do that when you are not one of the big players. Once you get a reputation for not being reliable, it is hard to change that with the FT West team.
  • Don’t look at the FT as part of your marketing strategy. They are not there to promote your products. If not connected to the broader themes of technology mentioned earlier – do not pitch them. Pitch products only in relation to how they connect with platform trends, consumer trends, changes in behavior and changes in how we do (or will do) things in our daily work and personal lives.
  • Do present company representatives for interviews but make it clear that they must come to the interview prepared to answer real questions. If your execs will only be reading from a script, then do not book them for an interview with the Financial Times.

San Francisco’s public relations community woke up early to enjoy a stimulating breakfast, hosted by Gorkana Group US and featuring the Financial Times. Richard Waters, San Francisco Bureau Chief and Editor, was joined by Correspondent Sarah Mishkin and the panel was moderated by Gorkana Group’s US Managing Director, Jeni Chapman. The lively panel imparted valuable pitching tips, discussed the trending stories they’re following, and offered their viewpoints on covering the tech bubble that is the Valley.

The Financial Times Difference

Richard Waters began by sharing some background on the global daily media outlet that has gone digital – with a large proportion of its subscribers getting the on-line edition that is published in four regions. The publication is truly global given its editing desks in London, Hong Kong and New York, which allows the Financial Times to cover news 24 hours a day. Indeed, 80% of the content developed by one hub is then shared around the world.. The San Francisco bureau provides coverage of the international technology industry for the paper’s worldwide audience of senior level business leaders and policy makers. Richard believes the mission is to tell readers what bigger forces are shaping their worlds, what issues are coming down the pike and what they should care about.

What themes gets the Financial Times West attention (and why)?

Examples of stories that currently are on point for the FT West team include:

  • the digital platform wars and their socio-economic implications for consumers
  • how technology innovation from smaller businesses is stimulating growth around the world – and how not all of that innovation is coming from the US backyard. For example, technology around how to enable “dumb phones” for e-commerce is a huge market place need in the developing world and this need is being met by innovators outside the US.
  • and how technology platforms are impacting and changing society.

How does a start-up get covered?

The Financial Times strives to spot industry trends early by looking at interesting, smaller businesses that are being led by an experienced or well-known management team and or by known tech funding firms. They follow pre-IPO companies that are receiving funding and going through the valuation process. The FT also keeps a keen eye on behavioral trends and produces stories that show how a product or proposition is driving a shift in consumer activity.

The Basics – What to do (and not to do) when working with the FT West team

In terms of best practice when working with the FT, Sarah and Richard had these recommendations for PR professionals:

  • Keep your pitches short but never pitch them over Twitter. Email only.
  • Never call to ask if they received your email. They have. If they have not responded, they are not interested or not able to go after the story at this time
  • As Sarah Mishkin said “ if your pitch is longer than my stories, that’s a problem.”
  • Don’t constantly re-schedule meetings – even if you are one of the “big tech” companies. And especially don’t do that when you are not one of the big players. Once you get a reputation for not being reliable, it is hard to change that with the FT West team.
  • Don’t look at the FT as part of your marketing strategy. They are not there to promote your products. If not connected to the broader themes of technology mentioned earlier – do not pitch them. Pitch products only in relation to how they connect with platform trends, consumer trends, changes in behavior and changes in how we do (or will do) things in our daily work and personal lives.
  • Do present company representatives for interviews but make it clear that they must come to the interview prepared to answer real questions. If your execs will only be reading from a script, then do not book them for an interview with the Financial Times.

- See more at: http://gorkana.us/news/consumer/events/the-dos-and-donts-of-getting-financial-times-west-coverage/#sthash.6YUqLeHa.dpuf

San Francisco’s public relations community woke up early to enjoy a stimulating breakfast, hosted by Gorkana Group US and featuring the Financial Times. Richard Waters, San Francisco Bureau Chief and Editor, was joined by Correspondent Sarah Mishkin and the panel was moderated by Gorkana Group’s US Managing Director, Jeni Chapman. The lively panel imparted valuable pitching tips, discussed the trending stories they’re following, and offered their viewpoints on covering the tech bubble that is the Valley.

The Financial Times Difference

Richard Waters began by sharing some background on the global daily media outlet that has gone digital – with a large proportion of its subscribers getting the on-line edition that is published in four regions. The publication is truly global given its editing desks in London, Hong Kong and New York, which allows the Financial Times to cover news 24 hours a day. Indeed, 80% of the content developed by one hub is then shared around the world.. The San Francisco bureau provides coverage of the international technology industry for the paper’s worldwide audience of senior level business leaders and policy makers. Richard believes the mission is to tell readers what bigger forces are shaping their worlds, what issues are coming down the pike and what they should care about.

What themes gets the Financial Times West attention (and why)?

Examples of stories that currently are on point for the FT West team include:

  • the digital platform wars and their socio-economic implications for consumers
  • how technology innovation from smaller businesses is stimulating growth around the world – and how not all of that innovation is coming from the US backyard. For example, technology around how to enable “dumb phones” for e-commerce is a huge market place need in the developing world and this need is being met by innovators outside the US.
  • and how technology platforms are impacting and changing society.

How does a start-up get covered?

The Financial Times strives to spot industry trends early by looking at interesting, smaller businesses that are being led by an experienced or well-known management team and or by known tech funding firms. They follow pre-IPO companies that are receiving funding and going through the valuation process. The FT also keeps a keen eye on behavioral trends and produces stories that show how a product or proposition is driving a shift in consumer activity.

The Basics – What to do (and not to do) when working with the FT West team

In terms of best practice when working with the FT, Sarah and Richard had these recommendations for PR professionals:

  • Keep your pitches short but never pitch them over Twitter. Email only.
  • Never call to ask if they received your email. They have. If they have not responded, they are not interested or not able to go after the story at this time
  • As Sarah Mishkin said “ if your pitch is longer than my stories, that’s a problem.”
  • Don’t constantly re-schedule meetings – even if you are one of the “big tech” companies. And especially don’t do that when you are not one of the big players. Once you get a reputation for not being reliable, it is hard to change that with the FT West team.
  • Don’t look at the FT as part of your marketing strategy. They are not there to promote your products. If not connected to the broader themes of technology mentioned earlier – do not pitch them. Pitch products only in relation to how they connect with platform trends, consumer trends, changes in behavior and changes in how we do (or will do) things in our daily work and personal lives.
  • Do present company representatives for interviews but make it clear that they must come to the interview prepared to answer real questions. If your execs will only be reading from a script, then do not book them for an interview with the Financial Times.

For more information on filing times and additional must know information about working with the FT West team, clients can click here to see the full FT profile in our database. For those not get part of the Gorkana Community – please click here to request a meeting.

- See more at: http://gorkana.us/news/consumer/events/the-dos-and-donts-of-getting-financial-times-west-coverage/#sthash.6YUqLeHa.dpuf

San Francisco’s public relations community woke up early to enjoy a stimulating breakfast, hosted by Gorkana Group US and featuring the Financial Times. Richard Waters, San Francisco Bureau Chief and Editor, was joined by Correspondent Sarah Mishkin and the panel was moderated by Gorkana Group’s US Managing Director, Jeni Chapman. The lively panel imparted valuable pitching tips, discussed the trending stories they’re following, and offered their viewpoints on covering the tech bubble that is the Valley.

The Financial Times Difference

Richard Waters began by sharing some background on the global daily media outlet that has gone digital – with a large proportion of its subscribers getting the on-line edition that is published in four regions. The publication is truly global given its editing desks in London, Hong Kong and New York, which allows the Financial Times to cover news 24 hours a day. Indeed, 80% of the content developed by one hub is then shared around the world.. The San Francisco bureau provides coverage of the international technology industry for the paper’s worldwide audience of senior level business leaders and policy makers. Richard believes the mission is to tell readers what bigger forces are shaping their worlds, what issues are coming down the pike and what they should care about.

What themes gets the Financial Times West attention (and why)?

Examples of stories that currently are on point for the FT West team include:

  • the digital platform wars and their socio-economic implications for consumers
  • how technology innovation from smaller businesses is stimulating growth around the world – and how not all of that innovation is coming from the US backyard. For example, technology around how to enable “dumb phones” for e-commerce is a huge market place need in the developing world and this need is being met by innovators outside the US.
  • and how technology platforms are impacting and changing society.

How does a start-up get covered?

The Financial Times strives to spot industry trends early by looking at interesting, smaller businesses that are being led by an experienced or well-known management team and or by known tech funding firms. They follow pre-IPO companies that are receiving funding and going through the valuation process. The FT also keeps a keen eye on behavioral trends and produces stories that show how a product or proposition is driving a shift in consumer activity.

The Basics – What to do (and not to do) when working with the FT West team

In terms of best practice when working with the FT, Sarah and Richard had these recommendations for PR professionals:

  • Keep your pitches short but never pitch them over Twitter. Email only.
  • Never call to ask if they received your email. They have. If they have not responded, they are not interested or not able to go after the story at this time
  • As Sarah Mishkin said “ if your pitch is longer than my stories, that’s a problem.”
  • Don’t constantly re-schedule meetings – even if you are one of the “big tech” companies. And especially don’t do that when you are not one of the big players. Once you get a reputation for not being reliable, it is hard to change that with the FT West team.
  • Don’t look at the FT as part of your marketing strategy. They are not there to promote your products. If not connected to the broader themes of technology mentioned earlier – do not pitch them. Pitch products only in relation to how they connect with platform trends, consumer trends, changes in behavior and changes in how we do (or will do) things in our daily work and personal lives.
  • Do present company representatives for interviews but make it clear that they must come to the interview prepared to answer real questions. If your execs will only be reading from a script, then do not book them for an interview with the Financial Times.

For more information on filing times and additional must know information about working with the FT West team, clients can click here to see the full FT profile in our database. For those not get part of the Gorkana Community – please click here to request a meeting.

- See more at: http://gorkana.us/news/consumer/events/the-dos-and-donts-of-getting-financial-times-west-coverage/#sthash.6YUqLeHa.dpuf

San Francisco’s public relations community woke up early to enjoy a stimulating breakfast, hosted by Gorkana Group US and featuring the Financial Times. Richard Waters, San Francisco Bureau Chief and Editor, was joined by Correspondent Sarah Mishkin and the panel was moderated by Gorkana Group’s US Managing Director, Jeni Chapman. The lively panel imparted valuable pitching tips, discussed the trending stories they’re following, and offered their viewpoints on covering the tech bubble that is the Valley.

The Financial Times Difference

Richard Waters began by sharing some background on the global daily media outlet that has gone digital – with a large proportion of its subscribers getting the on-line edition that is published in four regions. The publication is truly global given its editing desks in London, Hong Kong and New York, which allows the Financial Times to cover news 24 hours a day. Indeed, 80% of the content developed by one hub is then shared around the world.. The San Francisco bureau provides coverage of the international technology industry for the paper’s worldwide audience of senior level business leaders and policy makers. Richard believes the mission is to tell readers what bigger forces are shaping their worlds, what issues are coming down the pike and what they should care about.

What themes gets the Financial Times West attention (and why)?

Examples of stories that currently are on point for the FT West team include:

  • the digital platform wars and their socio-economic implications for consumers
  • how technology innovation from smaller businesses is stimulating growth around the world – and how not all of that innovation is coming from the US backyard. For example, technology around how to enable “dumb phones” for e-commerce is a huge market place need in the developing world and this need is being met by innovators outside the US.
  • and how technology platforms are impacting and changing society.

How does a start-up get covered?

The Financial Times strives to spot industry trends early by looking at interesting, smaller businesses that are being led by an experienced or well-known management team and or by known tech funding firms. They follow pre-IPO companies that are receiving funding and going through the valuation process. The FT also keeps a keen eye on behavioral trends and produces stories that show how a product or proposition is driving a shift in consumer activity.

The Basics – What to do (and not to do) when working with the FT West team

In terms of best practice when working with the FT, Sarah and Richard had these recommendations for PR professionals:

  • Keep your pitches short but never pitch them over Twitter. Email only.
  • Never call to ask if they received your email. They have. If they have not responded, they are not interested or not able to go after the story at this time
  • As Sarah Mishkin said “ if your pitch is longer than my stories, that’s a problem.”
  • Don’t constantly re-schedule meetings – even if you are one of the “big tech” companies. And especially don’t do that when you are not one of the big players. Once you get a reputation for not being reliable, it is hard to change that with the FT West team.
  • Don’t look at the FT as part of your marketing strategy. They are not there to promote your products. If not connected to the broader themes of technology mentioned earlier – do not pitch them. Pitch products only in relation to how they connect with platform trends, consumer trends, changes in behavior and changes in how we do (or will do) things in our daily work and personal lives.
  • Do present company representatives for interviews but make it clear that they must come to the interview prepared to answer real questions. If your execs will only be reading from a script, then do not book them for an interview with the Financial Times.

For more information on filing times and additional must know information about working with the FT West team, clients can click here to see the full FT profile in our database. For those not get part of the Gorkana Community – please click here to request a meeting.

- See more at: http://gorkana.us/news/consumer/events/the-dos-and-donts-of-getting-financial-times-west-coverage/#sthash.6YUqLeHa.dpuf

San Francisco’s public relations community woke up early to enjoy a stimulating breakfast, hosted by Gorkana Group US and featuring the Financial Times. Richard Waters, San Francisco Bureau Chief and Editor, was joined by Correspondent Sarah Mishkin and the panel was moderated by Gorkana Group’s US Managing Director, Jeni Chapman. The lively panel imparted valuable pitching tips, discussed the trending stories they’re following, and offered their viewpoints on covering the tech bubble that is the Valley.

The Financial Times Difference

Richard Waters began by sharing some background on the global daily media outlet that has gone digital – with a large proportion of its subscribers getting the on-line edition that is published in four regions. The publication is truly global given its editing desks in London, Hong Kong and New York, which allows the Financial Times to cover news 24 hours a day. Indeed, 80% of the content developed by one hub is then shared around the world.. The San Francisco bureau provides coverage of the international technology industry for the paper’s worldwide audience of senior level business leaders and policy makers. Richard believes the mission is to tell readers what bigger forces are shaping their worlds, what issues are coming down the pike and what they should care about.

What themes gets the Financial Times West attention (and why)?

Examples of stories that currently are on point for the FT West team include:

  • the digital platform wars and their socio-economic implications for consumers
  • how technology innovation from smaller businesses is stimulating growth around the world – and how not all of that innovation is coming from the US backyard. For example, technology around how to enable “dumb phones” for e-commerce is a huge market place need in the developing world and this need is being met by innovators outside the US.
  • and how technology platforms are impacting and changing society.

How does a start-up get covered?

The Financial Times strives to spot industry trends early by looking at interesting, smaller businesses that are being led by an experienced or well-known management team and or by known tech funding firms. They follow pre-IPO companies that are receiving funding and going through the valuation process. The FT also keeps a keen eye on behavioral trends and produces stories that show how a product or proposition is driving a shift in consumer activity.

The Basics – What to do (and not to do) when working with the FT West team

In terms of best practice when working with the FT, Sarah and Richard had these recommendations for PR professionals:

  • Keep your pitches short but never pitch them over Twitter. Email only.
  • Never call to ask if they received your email. They have. If they have not responded, they are not interested or not able to go after the story at this time
  • As Sarah Mishkin said “ if your pitch is longer than my stories, that’s a problem.”
  • Don’t constantly re-schedule meetings – even if you are one of the “big tech” companies. And especially don’t do that when you are not one of the big players. Once you get a reputation for not being reliable, it is hard to change that with the FT West team.
  • Don’t look at the FT as part of your marketing strategy. They are not there to promote your products. If not connected to the broader themes of technology mentioned earlier – do not pitch them. Pitch products only in relation to how they connect with platform trends, consumer trends, changes in behavior and changes in how we do (or will do) things in our daily work and personal lives.
  • Do present company representatives for interviews but make it clear that they must come to the interview prepared to answer real questions. If your execs will only be reading from a script, then do not book them for an interview with the Financial Times.

For more information on filing times and additional must know information about working with the FT West team, clients can click here to see the full FT profile in our database. For those not get part of the Gorkana Community – please click here to request a meeting.

- See more at: http://gorkana.us/news/consumer/events/the-dos-and-donts-of-getting-financial-times-west-coverage/#sthash.6YUqLeHa.dpuf

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